Wednesday, 10 November 2010

My attempt at having a coldframe

Because the weather is getting a bit colder, and I still want to sprout some last seedlings. I decided that It would be a nice project to have my very own cold frame. Of course that with the limitations on space and resources of my little balcony garden, I can't have a proper cold frame, so mine would have to be a cheap and easy knock off version.

To build it I just decided to go with simple and cheap materials. I went to the 100yen shop (the equivalent of a dollar store in japan) and got a plastic fabric bag for clothes, also used a tray that I had bought before from the same place. One more thing, because the fabric bag still lets some air go trough I added an extra layer of plastic to avoid any heat to escape by convection.

My-coldframe-3

My new coldbag!


The good thing about using the tray is that I can easily move the whole contraption inside in at night, if I want them to have an extra amount of heat.

My-coldframe-4

Getting ready to set some new seeds


I got some seeds ready in the colorful started pots from the strawberries, and now just let them be and wait.

My-coldframe-2

All set up, tight and tidy


It seems to be working well. The temperature inside has been one or two degrees higher than outside. Hopefully the seedlings will sprout soon and I will be able to have them ready before is to cold.

I decided to set three different kind of seedlings in it. Komatsuna and lettuce, to replace the ones I already finished on my big lettuce planter, and also chives because I think my garden was missing something from the onion family.

My-coldframe-1

They get a nice amount of sun, to make sure the temperature raises


Hopefully it will work, I will keep posting to let you know how it goes.

26 comments:

  1. Hi Fer; Another idea for you: use the big (2-litre?) plastic bottles in which fizzy drinks like Coke are sold, as miniature cloches. Cut off the bottom to make a tall thin mini-greenhouse, suitable for protecting one plant...

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is useful that you can bring your coldframe indoors if the temperatures should fall too far. The arrangement looks like it is working very well.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice post and very interesting, with clear instructions. I never has experience gardening in coll season...what a pity ;-(
    The adventure is fun!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good luck with your seedlings. Do keep us updated.

    ReplyDelete
  5. You go thru' to a lot of trouble just to keep the plants warm...awww..so sweet! Hope all yr new seeds will germinate in yr hot bag!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you! I just hope they do germinate and grow well. I think today i saw some komatsuna already poking through.

    Mark, thanks for the tip, I will try using it too

    And thanks for the new visits too, Is always nice to get to know more fellow gardenbloggers

    ReplyDelete
  7. Further to Mark's tip - we have 4 litre squared plastic bottles with a handle at the top that bottled water is sold in at the supermarket which would make larger 'cloches'. I did wonder how light got in to your 'cold frame' til I saw the photo of the other side.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hope everything grows well for you in your coldbag.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love when people think up their own ad hoc solutions to suit their own needs and limitations! I must remember to use that attitude more often, and not just when it comes to gardening...

    ReplyDelete
  10. that´s great! Plants need it warm when they grow.

    ReplyDelete
  11. How inventive you have been to see other possibilities for a fabric bag. Great idea! And it's even got a zipper!

    ReplyDelete
  12. No wonder your plants look so happy. You pamper them. Good idea!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Very clever fer! I wish you success and do hope you'll let us know how it turns out.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Very clever and I had never heard of the term cold bag so I learned something new today. I will be curious to what your project develop. I may have to try something similar on my back porch.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi Fer, this is so impressive. Show you don't need space to grow useful stuff, just ingenuity and a bit of committment. Good luck, let's keep in touch. cheers, catmint

    ReplyDelete
  16. Very creative idea! Hope to see the baby seedling soon!

    ReplyDelete
  17. How very smart to use a plastic clothes bag!! Bravo!! I hope your efforts are rewarded with fabulous plants!!! :0)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Very fun idea:) Hope the seeds germinate for you soon.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I too, as Mark above suggested, use recycled plastic bottles as cloches. This way you can also see what is going on underneath. But, I hope your way will work too.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Good job! Really professional... :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. Your optimism is admirable! I really hope it will work - doesn't seem impossible! The balcony pictures showed how compact your garden really is - an how high up!

    See ya!
    Stina

    ReplyDelete
  22. Very nice! I love your creativity, can't wait to see how your experiment does.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thanks! They already sprouted! I wanted to save the post about them sprouting for later, but also I don't want to be out of date.

    Also, I would like to try to use bottles, I think it would do great for harding them too, I just need to see how to set it up.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I've done this same exact thing using old bed comforter storage bags! It actually does work great. I've also used a clear plastic storage bin turned upside-down as a temporary cold frame/greenhouse.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...